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Archive for the ‘BOP’ Category

Business Continuity – Disaster vs. Recovery

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25% of businesses do not reopen after a major loss.

48% of businesses do not even pretend to have a business continuity plan.*

But 95% think they are prepared.*

Is your plan only keeping your insurance policy somewhere safe?  (Which is not the worst start in the world, but it’s grossly inadequate.)

Do you have tasks for each employee after a disaster?  (Did they actually agree to them?)

What would actually be a disaster for your company?  (Flood, hurricane, fire, data breach, lawsuit, death of an owner?)

Yes, sometimes  it seems like the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, but these things really do happen.

There are many small businesses which would suffer less from a flood than from a cyber breach;  doctors, lawyers, insurance agents, consultants, architects come to mind.

There are many small businesses which would suffer less from a hurricane than they would from the death of an owner without a succession plan, or adequate life insurance.

Spend a few hours once a year to prepare a continuity plan; surviving a disaster will be much more pleasant if you do.  Then talk to your insurance advisor so you know if you have money to help you recover.

*Travelers Insurance survey result

GBW Insurance/AssuredPartners 855-467-2877, extension 677

19% have Cyber Insurance, 50% expect more attacks

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Computer_Drill_10-14Most companies don’t have cyber/data breach insurance.  And most think attacks are getting worse (and they’re right).  But even large companies are 4 times more likely to use insurance to protect loss of physical assets than loss of data.

These figures come from a current Ponemon Institute study quoted by the national Professional Insurance Agents. (PIA)  There’s a link to the study at the bottom of this post.

What do we have to do to convince businesses to protect themselves?

I think, as President of the New Jersey Professional Insurance Agents in addition to GBW Insurance, that most agents are including information about Cyber issues in their talks with clients.  But the level of misinformation and ignorance at the client end is still very high.

Smaller businesses tend to assume 1) that they are not exposed, and 2) that there is adequate coverage in their basic insurance policies.  #1 is a bad joke; small businesses are great targets for hackers and even better for disgruntled employees.  And #2 is a fantasy.

I’m going to go write another letter to all our business clients…

Professional Insurance Agents (PIA) link to the study

The Ponemon Institute study has many other entertaining facts. For example, large  publicly held companies said they would have to disclose large lawsuits or large-scale damage to physical assets, but not cyber penetration.  I’d like to hear a business litigation attorney on that one.

Who owns your company’s data? How do you make sure?

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You own your data, but you have to take steps to make sure you can control it, both legally and in the cyber world.

Do your employees use only devices your company owns?
Have they acknowledged that their information on those devices is not private?

If they use their own devices to access your information, have they agreed to let you review any and all information on those devices?
Have they agreed to let you wipe their devices if you find your information on them?

All of this should involve help from your own lawyer.

Even if you get a signed acknowledgement that you can look at their information and look at information on devices they own, you’d better be talking to your own lawyer if you run into a communication between your employee and his or her own attorney.

On the IT front, a good IT provider can help erect barriers to penetration by outsiders, and to theft of data by insiders.

But multiple platforms are complicating IT.  Mobile malware is exploding.  And many small businesses don’t keep current with firewalls and monitoring of data use.

If you’d like to discuss IT issues in more depth, try this link to IT Radix.  And we thank them for putting on the seminar that provoked many of these questions today.

The legal questions in the seminar today were posed by Colin Page, Esq.  Try this link to make contact with his law firm if you have questions on data ownership and employment issues.

Insurance Company Financial Stability

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Insurance companies are rated for financial strength.  Why does that matter?

Insurance is a promise to pay future losses.  If the company does not have a future, no payments.  And some losses are going to happen years down the line.

Property losses tend to be settled shortly after they occur.  You owned a building, it burned, the value is usually relatively easy to establish, you are paid for the loss.  The solvency of your insurance company is not of concern because of time, but because property is exposed to catastrophic threats such as hurricanes, which might bankrupt a small insurance carrier which has not prepared properly.

Liability losses, especially large losses, are usually litigated.  That can take years.  If an insurance company becomes insolvent, that will at a minimum complicate and delay settlement and payment.  An insurance company which misestimates its average losses far in the future will be in trouble.

So, how do you assess the strength of your insurance company?  While states review the strength of insurance companies within their supervision, day to day the best measurement is available from private companies that specialize in rating insurance carriers.

Without getting into a long discussion of the relative merits of the rating companies, one of the best is A.M. Best.  Ratings run from A++ to F, with additional notes for the future (stable, negative, favorable).  Here’s a link to Best’s explanation of their financial strength ratings.    You can sign into Best for free to get basic rating information on most insurance carriers.  (Some decline to submit their results for rating.  Not a great sign about the company.)

Or call GBW Insurance at 1-800-548-2329 and we can give you the information.  We are also paid subscribers and are therefore able to access detailed information as well.  www.GBWinsurance.com

Fire protection – A Spring problem – Fire Insurance

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A cautionary note from our friends at the fire protection company, City Fire Equipment

It’s April and Spring is finally here! With the changing of the seasons, things in our environment are starting to change. There is actually one highly flammable substance in nature that only exists during this short time of the year. Can you guess what it is?

Answer: Pollen

Employees here have witnessed serious pollen fires before, so it is something to keep aware of in the next few coming weeks if you have pollen buildup on your properties. Be sure to sweep pollen away and into gutters and away from any outside electrical/mechanical machinery that produces any type of heat.

And remember, April showers, bring May flowers!

Kind Regards,

City Fire Equipment Co., Inc. (click here for the City Fire web site)

Or click here for property insurance quotes in NJ

 

Autumn Maintenance

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Thanks to Peerless insurance, here are tips and a link to a video with brief suggestions about preparing for Fall weather.  Some forms of damage would be covered by most insurance packages, some wouldn’t.  Either way, it’s a lot easier to not have the loss in the first place.

  • Ice Dams
  • Flat roof problems
  • Pitched roofs
  • Gutter guards
  • Of course, ladder safety goes with all that
  • Preparing vehicles
  • Protecting property
  • Sprinkler preparation

Link to Autumn Maintenance video by Peerless Insurance

Click here to get a quick quote or insurance review in New Jersey

Responding to Slip and Fall Incidents

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Our thanks to CNA Insurance Risk Control for much of this advice.  You can call us at 1-800-548-2329 for more information or skip to the bottom of this page for CNA’s web site.

BE PREPARED FOR A SLIP-AND-FALL INCIDENT
It might be a visitor.
It might be a customer.
It might be your own employee.
But, chances are, you won’t be there to see it should someone slip and fall in a building you maintain.
Sound Planning Can Help
A well thought out plan ensures that injured persons will be treated promptly and puts you in control of the process. CNA has developed these guidelines to help you efficiently manage slip and fall accidents. When a slip and fall happens…
Immediately
1. Offer medical attention.
• Administer first aid at the scene.
• Call for emergency service if needed.
• Suggest a medical provider for follow-up care.
(For employee injuries, refer or suggest a medical provider if doing so is allowed by your state.)
2. Gather and document information.
• Name, address, phone number of injured person.
• Names, addresses, phone numbers of witnesses.
• Injured person’s description of what happened.
• Pictures of accident (floor, spill, etc.).
3. Report the accident.
• Ask your customers to notify you immediately of any slip and falls on floor surfaces you maintain.
• Notify your insurance company of all losses, even if the information you have is incomplete.
Within 24 Hours
1. Contact the injured person (or parent of minor).
• Communicate your concern and verify whether treatment was received.
• In all cases, avoid discussion of “blame.” Assure the injured person that the accident will be investigated.
• Be alert for claimant’s “expectations.” Communicate them to your insurance company.
• Make sure injured employees understand that a claim will be processed for Workers’ Compensation benefits with regard to medical bills and time off from work (if applicable).
2. For injured employees, work closely with the claim department at your insurance company.
• To provide the physician with the injury report that includes all the information you reported.
• To provide the physician with a detailed description of the injured employee’s current job duties.
• To communicate your support in returning the injured employee to work, and to light duty as necessary.
3. For all accidents, determine facts and circumstances.
• Identify specific materials, equipment, or tools involved in the accident and keep evidence in a safe place.
• Do not discard damaged or broken equipment involved in an accident. Keep it in a secure place where it will not be inadvertently put into use or destroyed. Altering, destroying, or discarding it could lead to an adverse finding.
• Develop a plan of action to prevent similar incidents.
• Notify customers of potentially hazardous conditions, which require action on their part for accident prevention.
After the Accident Occurs
1. Maintain an accident injury management record (Call us at 1-800-548-2329 for more information).
Whatever format you choose – a paper filing system or a computer database – your records should include:
• Injury report – include all information reported to the insurance company.
• Log of all communication related to claim
• Dates
• Contacts
• Documentation of discussion
• For employees, information on return-to-work status
2. Notify your insurance company of any new information you may receive or develop.
• About the accident
• About the injury
• About employee work status
• About legal representation or suit filings
Don’t let claims “slip and fall” between the cracks!
Loss Reporting Tips
• These same slip and fall guidelines apply to your customers – you can help by educating them on reporting slips and falls.
• Ask customers to notify you immediately of any incident involving a fall, no matter how minor.
• Make sure your employees know what to do when a fall occurs or if they themselves are injured.
• When an employee does not report for work due to illness, always inquire to see if the absence may be work related.
• Make sure one person is responsible for reporting all losses to your insurance company. Cross train a back-up for that person.
A Note About Fraud

Slip and fall scams take advantage of existing hazards and it’s been proven that they can be staged to collect benefits. These claims require careful management and scrutiny. It can be difficult to disprove allegations of a fraudulent slip and fall.
You can help your insurance company get a jump on fraudulent claims by consistently following these steps:
• Immediate notice of all accidents will help identify and deny fraudulent claims.
• Gathering and documenting evidence and facts while they are fresh will help to successfully defend fraudulent claims.
• Having a plan for medical care will help in getting an immediate, objective evaluation and serve as documentation of the alleged injury.
• Following consistent slip and fall management guidelines will help to accurately identify claims that have merit and those that do not.

Go to www.cna.com/riskcontrol for more information.